TPN.health

Dr. Jason Whitney Presents: Results from a 2017 Study on the Lived Experience of Students in Collegiate Recovery Programs

Friday, March 19, 2021 | 10:00am - 11:30am, CST

Pricing: 
- Basic: $30
- Premium: Free ($15 after 10 CE Hours Reached)
- Unlimited: Free

In this session, Dr. Whitney will share results of his 2017 study of the lived experiences of students in collegiate recovery programs at the University of Michigan, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and Penn State. In-depth interviews revealed three main discursive themes: 1) Recovery discourses were primarily rooted in the discourses of Alcoholics Anonymous. 2) A second set of discourses instilled an imperative to work towards success, driving students to acquire the prolonged, specialized educations and other qualifications necessary to gain a professional career. 3) In a third set of discourses, students in CRPs defined and claimed social power for their CRP and helped establish various means for students in recovery to be “cool” in college. Using discourses in creative combinations to make sense of their experience and to (re)position themselves, students in CRPs resisted college discourses that invited them to return to active use of alcohol and other substances.

Pending Approval for Addictions Counselors

Sale price Price $30.00 Regular price Unit price  per 

TPN.health

Dr. Jason Whitney Presents: Results from a 2017 Study on the Lived Experience of Students in Collegiate Recovery Programs

Friday, March 19, 2021 | 10:00am - 11:30am, CST

Pricing: 
- Basic: $30
- Premium: Free ($15 after 10 CE Hours Reached)
- Unlimited: Free

In this session, Dr. Whitney will share results of his 2017 study of the lived experiences of students in collegiate recovery programs at the University of Michigan, the University of Colorado at Boulder, and Penn State. In-depth interviews revealed three main discursive themes: 1) Recovery discourses were primarily rooted in the discourses of Alcoholics Anonymous. 2) A second set of discourses instilled an imperative to work towards success, driving students to acquire the prolonged, specialized educations and other qualifications necessary to gain a professional career. 3) In a third set of discourses, students in CRPs defined and claimed social power for their CRP and helped establish various means for students in recovery to be “cool” in college. Using discourses in creative combinations to make sense of their experience and to (re)position themselves, students in CRPs resisted college discourses that invited them to return to active use of alcohol and other substances.

Pending Approval for Addictions Counselors